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Rockets target US interests despite arrests: Iraq military Click Here to Open in a New Window

Rockets target US interests despite arrests: Iraq militaryTwo rocket attacks targeted American diplomatic and military installations overnight, Iraq's security forces said Sunday, a little over a week since unprecedented arrests prevented a similar incident. Since October, US diplomats and troops across Iraq have been targeted by around three dozen missile attacks which Washington has blamed on pro-Iranian armed factions. In the first move of its kind, elite Iraqi troops in late June arrested more than a dozen Tehran-backed fighters who were allegedly planning a new attack on Baghdad's Green Zone, home to the US and other foreign embassies.



Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War Click Here to Open in a New Window

Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a WarFighter jets, stealth bombers, attack drones and air-traveling missiles all need to “operate at speed” in a fast-changing great power conflict era. What that means is that “sensor to shooter” time (how fast data can go from a sensor to a war-fighter) needs to be drastically sped up. Without that speed, warfighters won’t be able to react as quickly to threats and it will be harder to win.



24-Year-Old Protester Dies After Car Drove Into Peaceful Crowd in Seattle Click Here to Open in a New Window

24-Year-Old Protester Dies After Car Drove Into Peaceful Crowd in SeattleThe driver sped around a series of vehicles set up by the protesters to protect themselves



To send a message to China, President Trump should visit Taiwan Click Here to Open in a New Window

To send a message to China, President Trump should visit TaiwanWith the loss of Hong Kong to China, Trump should visit Taiwan to show that the U.S. is serious about advancing its interests and values in the region.



Applebee’s employee dies in parking lot while celebrating July 4, Texas police say Click Here to Open in a New Window

Applebee’s employee dies in parking lot while celebrating July 4, Texas police sayWorkers had just closed the restaurant for the night, police say.



Pesky storm to keep southeastern US drenched into midweek Click Here to Open in a New Window

Pesky storm to keep southeastern US drenched into midweekForecasters are carefully monitoring a slow-moving storm system that has brought repeated downpours to the Southeast since last week. Widespread showers and thunderstorms will continue daily into the middle of the week -- and meteorologists say tropical development of this feature cannot be fully ruled out as it wanders toward the coast.Residents and visitors may continue to struggle to find long enough dry breaks to get outside and enjoy summertime activities, such as fishing, golfing and swimming. AccuWeather's MinuteCast® tool can tell you exactly when rain will arrive in your area and how long it will last."Showers and thunderstorms will be widespread from extreme East Texas and Louisiana to Georgia and South Carolina through Tuesday as a low pressure area drifts eastward from the lower Mississippi Valley to the southern Appalachians," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Joe Lundberg said. These areas have been doused by repeated downpours since last week, so any additional rainfall may struggle to soak into the saturated ground. As a result, the risk of flash flooding will be high."Many locations across the South and into the Southeast will receive 1-2 inches of additional rainfall through Tuesday, but isolated amounts of up to 5 inches are possible," Lundberg said, adding that the Florida Panhandle, Georgia and South Carolina may be the hardest-hit areas during the first half of the week.CLICK HERE FOR THE FREE ACCUWEATHER APPDrivers on stretches of interstates 10, 20, 55, 65, 75, 85 and 95 are likely to face slower-than-normal travel times due to the downpours reducing visibility and creating a heightened risk of vehicles hydroplaning at highway speeds.Remember to never drive through floodwaters and instead turn around and find a safer, alternate route."As this low slowly meanders toward the Southeast coast, the area of enhanced rainfall will shift more into the Carolinas, perhaps even extreme southeast Virginia during the latter half of the week," Lundberg said. "The amount of rain during the second half of the week may be dependent upon potential surface development of this system and its ability to draw even more moisture inland off the warm waters of the Gulf stream," Lundberg added.Regardless, AccuWeather meteorologists expect several inches of rainfall to douse the southern Atlantic Seaboard during the middle and latter part of the week, with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ rainfall of 6 inches possible centered on the Carolinas.The key to whether tropical development can occur with this system later in the week lies in how far east the center of the storm can make it off the coast of the Carolinas, according to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dan Pydynowski."If the storm remains onshore or hugs the coastline, its interaction with land could limit its chance to develop and organize further. However, if the low center can drift far enough east off the coast of the Carolinas by later Wednesday or Thursday, then its chance to develop and organize further will increase, especially if it gets over the warm waters of the Gulf stream," Pydynowski said. Should tropical development occur, this would enhance rough surf and coastal flooding concerns, as well as the potential for gusty winds, from the Carolinas to the Delmarva Peninsula.Even in the absence of tropical development, forecasters say the storm will remain a disruption for those with travel, vacation and outdoor plans across the region as downpours persist.An upside to the stormier pattern will be a lack of intense heat that can be typical of the region during the summer months.While heat bakes areas from the Midwest to the mid-Atlantic, it will actually be a bit below average across the Southeast due to the widespread downpours, according to Lundberg.For example, Atlanta may only be in the lower to middle 80s during the first half of this week, when a more typical high for early July is around 90.Keep checking back on AccuWeather.com and stay tuned to the AccuWeather Network on DirecTV, Frontier and Verizon Fios.



Spain locks down a region of 200,000 people indefinitely after it experienced a spike in COVID-19 cases Click Here to Open in a New Window

Spain locks down a region of 200,000 people indefinitely after it experienced a spike in COVID-19 casesThe government's news agency reported that the region had seen 72,860 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 12,586 deaths.



Predominantly Black armed protesters march through Confederate memorial park in Georgia Click Here to Open in a New Window

Predominantly Black armed protesters march through Confederate memorial park in GeorgiaA predominantly Black group of heavily armed protesters marched through Stone Mountain Park near Atlanta on Saturday, calling for removal of the giant Confederate rock carving at the site that civil rights activists consider a monument to racism.



Constitutional changes are the 'right thing' for Russia: Putin Click Here to Open in a New Window

Constitutional changes are the 'right thing' for Russia: PutinPresident Vladimir Putin said on Sunday constitutional amendments approved in a nationwide vote created the conditions for Russia's "progressive development" for decades to come. One of the changes approved in the week-long vote that ended on July 1 makes it possible for Putin to seek two more terms as president and, if re-elected, to stay in power until 2036. "They will strengthen our nationhood and create conditions for the progressive development of our country for decades to come," he said.



Life on the Vice Presidential Short List Click Here to Open in a New Window

Life on the Vice Presidential Short ListThere will be blood tests. Interrogations about junior high. An analysis of tax returns.It is an experience Joe Biden knows all too well from his time on the vice presidential short list 12 years ago.Much about Biden's own search for a running mate has been nontraditional. He has publicly mused about his criteria. He is not considering men. Above all, his choice could be the most important in years: At 77, Biden has said he views himself as a "transition candidate." Left unsaid: His vice president could very well end up being the president next.Yet as much as Biden's process is unique, its contours are familiar. Late last month, he told a local television station that his campaign had begun "doing the background checks" -- the latest sign that he is moving toward a short list of candidates.If history is a guide, Biden's top contenders should expect to submit themselves to a process that veterans liken to a series of graphic medical procedures. Extraneous? Maybe. But, well, sometimes that's the vice presidency, too."They basically are disassembling your entire life," said Kathleen Sebelius, a former Democratic governor of Kansas who, along with Biden, was vetted extensively by the Obama campaign in 2008. "It was as intrusive and probing as anything I've ever been through or would hope to ever go through again."Evan Bayh, a former Democratic senator from Indiana and a repeat vice presidential contestant, somewhat famously compared the vetting process to a colonoscopy -- "except they use the Hubble telescope on you."Indeed, when Barack Obama called Biden in June 2008 to request permission to vet him, Biden initially said no. Finally, he wrote in his 2017 memoir, "I agreed to go through the vetting process, but not with a whole lot of enthusiasm."Sebelius said Obama had called her when she was at a hotel for a meeting. Like Biden, she tried to persuade him not to vet her. "I spent a little bit of time telling him why that was a terrible idea," she recalled. He was undeterred: A member of his vetting team was waiting to speak to her in a room downstairs.One of the cardinal rules of the process is secrecy, and nearly everyone obeys. Most potential running mates do not speak about the search, if they acknowledge they are being vetted at all. Bob Kerrey, the former Nebraska senator who was vetted by Bill Clinton in 1992, said he flew on a friend's private plane to the governor's mansion in Little Rock, Arkansas, for a meeting so almost no one would know where he was.Presidential candidates consider many factors when selecting their running mates. They are not always political. Kerrey, for instance, said he suspected early on he wasn't getting the job. For one, he wasn't married at the time, and he worried that the optics in a photograph would be off."You need to have Bill and Hillary and somebody and somebody," Kerrey said. "You don't want Bill and Hillary and Bob."Vetting procedures have become increasingly rigorous, in part because campaigns are wary of what can happen if details are overlooked. More recently, the availability of potentially incriminating details on the internet has made vetting seem more imperative than ever, lest anyone dig up a surprise. (Of course, the election of President Donald Trump showed that voters might also shrug off what might once have been disqualifying information.)Tim Pawlenty, a former Minnesota governor, recalled scrambling with his wife, Mary, in 2008 to provide all the information John McCain requested as part of his vetting."At one point during the process, our entire living room was covered with documents as Mary and I organized them, typed up answers to the lengthy questionnaire and organized it all into 3-ring binders," he said in an email. They stayed up late and subsisted on pizza as they raced to meet the campaign's deadlines.Julian Castro, whom Hillary Clinton vetted extensively in 2016, said her campaign had given him a survey seeking answers to more than 120 questions about his personal, political and financial history.At one point during the interview to go over the responses, one of the questioners spotted Castro's cellphone. What would the questioner find, he asked, if he were to take Castro's phone and go through it right now? (No, Castro did not provide the answer to The New York Times.)"You recognize the gravity of this process," he said. "But it still has this spy thriller, cloak-and-dagger aspect to it all."With the global pandemic sidelining much of Biden's in-person presidential campaign, his veepstakes has become a welcome throwback to normal post-primary political activity.Already, one of Biden's top contenders, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, has formally withdrawn from contention. In an interview with MSNBC last month, she referred to the calls for racial justice that have swept the country since the death of George Floyd at the hands of the Minneapolis police, saying she believed "that this is a moment to put a woman of color on that ticket."Faux modesty is also part of the game: Everyone whose name is on a list almost always declares themselves honored just to be thought of at all. When Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada said in May she was withdrawing from consideration, she said that it was "an honor to be considered" but that she wanted to keep her focus on her home state.A brief survey of short-listed names over the years reveals some perennial participants. Pawlenty, for instance, was vetted by both McCain and Mitt Romney. Bayh was seriously considered by Al Gore and Obama.Biden has also at times mentioned some familiar names, including Sen. Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire, who was one of Gore's finalists. (Shaheen, however, reportedly told Biden she was not interested in serving as his vice president.) But his pledge to choose a woman has eliminated most of the usual names from contention.Obama called Biden to tell him he had gotten the job as Biden was waiting at a dentist's office while his wife, Jill, was having a root canal. Despite Biden's reluctance just weeks earlier, he was delighted. "I accepted without hesitation," Biden said. "It felt good to say yes."But as it most often does, the process for most of Biden's prospects will likely end in disappointment -- and possibly some relief.James Stavridis, a retired admiral who was vetted by Hillary Clinton's campaign, said it had been so intrusive and secretive that he jokingly told a friend, former CIA spokesman Bill Harlow, that he hoped he was really providing all the information to the Clinton campaign and not Russian intelligence.When he was not chosen, he and Harlow decided to write a "humorous novel about the Russians penetrating the U.S. VP selection process." In the proposal for the book, called "The Veepstakes," they described the tone as "stylistically, an 'entertainment' a la Chris Buckley or Elmore Leonard."The proposal was widely rejected, Stavridis said. The premise was too implausible.Castro professed to being disappointed when Hillary Clinton ultimately selected Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia but said he was "glad that all of that speculation was over."The experience also came with an unexpected benefit. As part of his vetting, Castro had to get a blood test, forcing him to confront a phobia he had harbored since he was a young child."The best thing was that I had to get over that fear," he said. "It certainly wasn't that I got the job, because I didn't."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company



Alleged email scammer who flaunted wealth on Instagram to face charges Click Here to Open in a New Window

Alleged email scammer who flaunted wealth on Instagram to face chargesRamon Olorunwa Abbas routinely posted about luxury cars, private jets and globe trotting with celebrities to his 2.4 million followers.



Mexico's COVID deaths pass 30,000, world's 5th highest total Click Here to Open in a New Window

Mexico's COVID deaths pass 30,000, world's 5th highest totalMexico topped 30,000 COVID-19 deaths Saturday, overtaking France as the country with the fifth-highest death toll since the coronavirus outbreak began. Officials reported 523 more confirmed coronavirus deaths for the day, bringing the nation's total to 30,366 for the pandemic. Mexico's total confirmed infections rose by almost 6,000 to 251,165, about on par with Spain, the eighth highest caseload.



US nuclear envoy to visit South Korea, Japan next week Click Here to Open in a New Window
Seoul [South Korea], July 4 (ANI): The top American envoy for North Korea will visit South Korea and Japan next week amid stalled denuclearisation talks between Washington and Pyongyang, a diplomatic
Biden Slams Trump on Russia Bounties in Foreign Policy Contrast Click Here to Open in a New Window

WASHINGTON - Presumptive Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden's rebuke of President Donald Trump's handling of allegations that Russians paid bounties for the killing of American soldiers re


North Korea Says It Has No Plans for Talks with US Click Here to Open in a New Window

TEHRAN (Tasnim) - North Korea on Saturday reiterated it has no immediate plans to resume nuclear negotiations with the United States unless Washington discards what it describes as "hostile" police


DPRK feels no need for another Kim-Trump summit: official Click Here to Open in a New Window

PYONGYANG, July 4 (Xinhua) -- The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) feels no need to sit face to face with the United States as the latter only considers the dialogue as a tool for grapp


Coronavirus- South Korea closes schools again after biggest spike in weeks Click Here to Open in a New Window
Coronavirus: South Korea closes schools again after biggest spike in weeks BBC News
US and South Korea reach agreement to fund Koreans working for US Forces Korea Politics Click Here to Open in a New Window
US and South Korea reach agreement to fund Koreans working for US Forces Korea CNN
Taiwan Edges South Korea as Largest Base for IC Wafer Capacity - EE Times Asia Click Here to Open in a New Window
Taiwan Edges South Korea as Largest Base for IC Wafer Capacity Eetasia.com
Asia Today- South Korea reports 60-plus cases, 8 in China Click Here to Open in a New Window
Asia Today: South Korea reports 60-plus cases, 8 in China Bay News 9
Privacy vs. Pandemic Control in South Korea - Womble Bond Dickinson - JDSupra Click Here to Open in a New Window
Privacy vs. Pandemic Control in South Korea - Womble Bond Dickinson JD Supra
The Latest- South Korea has 63 newly confirmed virus cases Click Here to Open in a New Window
The Latest: South Korea has 63 newly confirmed virus cases The Associated Press
(LEAD) Seoul stocks sink almost 5 pct on another looming wave of virus outbreak Click Here to Open in a New Window
(LEAD) Seoul stocks sink almost 5 pct on another looming wave of virus outbreak Yonhap News
North Korea threatens South Korea with ending of military pact - Seoul vs Pyongyang Click Here to Open in a New Window
North Korea threatens South Korea with ending of military pact - Seoul vs Pyongyang Economic Times





North Korea at Wikipedia Click Here to Open in a New Window
North Korea at CIA FactBook Click Here to Open in a New Window


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